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environment. now, people are a lot more positive about the u.s., so they're overweighting the u.s. the s. is still ary, very strong mark so many overweight that. and we're seeing a lot of regions like europe where investors are pretty much hands-off. so it depends, really, when you ask about how investors behave, where they come from, what region they're located in, and what region they invest in. european investors are, i would say, largely sitting on the sidelines. >> i'm going to come back to you in a moment. but let me ask you first about what's going on in the united states. a big debate about when the federal reserve is going to start winding down the stimulus. is there a downside risk to all of this free money, whether you look at what the fed has been doing with qe or what japan has been doing in terms of the stimulus there, the ecb as well. >> well, yes, it's very clear that central banks have been playing a very dominant role in the economy over the last couple of years. when i was at the imf meetings but still in davos, the talk was the central banks are still the only game in
the chief of production goals from unconventional shell plays, i think the environment going forward has never looked brighter for u.s. infrastructure. >> i think et was yesterday someone said nat gas is the new safe haven, suddenly this is start to go look a little more price afforded. any view on that? >> i think that dmodty prices, a broader view, i think that peak energy, we believe in just the opposite at yorkville. we think energy prices will probably be the growth driver of the global economy. it has a lot of implications. it's very good for the u.s. and our consumers. it's very good for china. >> you say peak energy in terms of we're going to see declines -- >> i think we're going to see stability. the new energy supplies coming online are more expensive to extract from the ground, so you're not going to get back to $20 a barrel oil in our lifetime. but this $80 to $11 is 00, peaking at $120 dropping to $60 is probably a new range in the u.s. i see natural gas, it's at 350 right now, roughly, $4 to $6 range, $16 in japan, mid teen prices in germany. that's giving us a competitive
in the after-hours, if people are short-covering they're doing it obviously in a more difficult environment. david: who would have guessed it was in double digits less than a year ago it is trading over 200. it hasn't traded over 200 a share since september 14th, 2011. this is long way coming. liz: long way to go. david: have you been to the airport recently? you go to the airport all the time. you go home to the airport to get back to new jersey. airport delays as faa furloughs begin to kick in. liz: rich edson at the airport. what are you hearing overall about the situation, rich? overall we got hundreds of delays yesterday. airline association says we could see up to a few thousand delays because of this when you look at this, go around the country, there are delays in charlotte, there are delays elsewhere. faa is saying there are delays basically close to coast. as far as specifics are concerned they could not provide us with any ties of numbers. that has a number about folks, especially republicans in congress say this is entirely structured by the faa to inflict what they say is maxim
are in a no growth environment. they are getting in the way of growth. the news in europe is extremely bad and going to get worse. their economy looks just absolutely horrible. stuart: they give very much, indeed. a very clean cut opinion. we appreciate that. thank you very much. the opening bell coming up 20 seconds from now. maybe a gain of ten-15 points. please remember we were down 138 points yesterday. 352,000 new claims for unemployment insurance. that was last week. that is a relative high number. nothing like what you expected. firing trend, the layoff trend still very much with us. we opened 11 points higher. now, we are up 23. let's get right to it. apple. where did it open today? nicole petallides. nicole: at least they have an up arrow today. we have to keep a close eye on apple. people who own apple not only is they are hot on technology, but if they are on the s&p 500. stuart: down 25% so far this year. down about 50% from september, october of last year. we get the earnings next week. a big buildup for that. tuesday of next week, i believe. the opening quote for apple had a fault righ
back to what is a normalized environment. what does that even mean? i can't value it. i don't know how to value. >> i think it's interesting, the mainstream press. the front page of the washington post is the spring swoon and how we cannot seem to escape this economic decline and we've seen the past couple of springs and the front page of the journal is walmart and kohl's taking more time to pay their supplier, a trend they say is getting worse. those are not marginal positives, jim. i look at bank of america. i look at j.p. morgan and i say i'll pay 83.5 for 50,000 j & j. the trade is i don't want to mess with the stuff. proctor, look, he's making the quarter. he's going to make the quarter. >> raw costs coming down and coca-cola, by the way. raw costs are coming down, but they will come down. another one that is just where people are hiding. david, it's hide and don't seek. >> it is, but to carl's point, we've come out of the last few years and animal spirits start to feel strong. >> right. underlying economic growth is strong and everyone is revising up their gdp numbers up to three
and the potential for further government spending cuts and the regulatory environment. >>> and listen up, everybody.it looks like fed chairman ben bernanke, he's going to to the annual jackson hole symposium this week. it may not sound like a big deal, but this is the first time he's marked that event since 2006. reuters quote the spokes woman who says bernanke is not planning on attending because of a personal scheduling conarthritic. they've used this forum to try ask preview important fed actions. just about every big move they've made along the way he has made public at jackson hole. people have been wondering if he was going to talk about a potential successor this time around. >> can i give you a conspiracy theory? if this is -- this is like your place. if you run the fed, you go to this thing, right? and if this was going to be the last time you could go as the fed chairman, if you thought that he was going to be stepping down next fall or next spring, rather, you probably would find a way to show up. >> actually, i look ate more as him having not made up his mind yet. if you haven't decide
's a target-rich environment. the fact that they're here and took part of the educational system and one was with a scholarship potentially. it's deeply disturbing and makes you wonder what goes through somebody's mind that can hurt innocent people, women and children and spectators. it's cowardly and hopefully we'll learn from this issue and grow from it. i tell you what, stuart, i don't know what else to say except that god bless everybody who's been saying prayers for us and also for those folks who have been doing their jobs and putting their lives on the line trying to make us all safe. stuart: well said. i'm going to ask you if you'd stay there for one second. i have to take a brief pause so we can go on to delay. by going on delay we can show you pictures coming from the house in watertown and to make sure. we've got to delay to make sure you don't see anything untwoowa. i've got a five second delay. hold on, everyone. now, senator brown, still with us and appreciate you being here with us on a difficult day for boston. would you describe again, the center of boston, downtown? i t
advertisers into an environment with twitter to really understand the social tv space. melissa: what does that mean in english for people that do not understand advertising? >> went to third audience are sitting next to their smart phone and tablet and watching tv. there are conversations happening. their customers include coca-cola, procter and gamble, all of the big names that are out there. they will be able to go on twitter and mine what consumers are talking about. what shows they are watching. it seems like you can collect data. it is endless. >> absolutely. how do we mind these opportunities whether it is direct to understand the conversation. we can make sure that our brands are more fully embedded and engaging. melissa: i am an avid twitter user. it is easy, clean, straightforward. there is not a lot of clutter. what is an add on twitter going to look like and will it ruin the experience? >> i think it will look very different tomorrow than it does today. you want to create advertising that is even more relevant. you wanted to be more engaging. melissa: it is not the difference b
there is almost a divorce on how earnings and economies grow. connell: how does that environment sustain itself? >> is it sustainable in the long run, no. that means over a ten year cycle. i am focused over the next year or two years. earnings can continue to grow because we see 20% of s&p 500 companies hoarding. only 45% have beat revenues. i think that we could be in a period of time where we have a divergence in the markets between those that are doing really well and those that are not doing really well at all. you could get a lot of disparities. connell: brian jacobson, wells fargo, thank you very much. appreciate it. >> thank you. dagen: rilling knowing about it through minor. connell: at&t versus google. we will tell you why. we will keep an eye on the market. a big day today. oil is down. we will be back with much more on market now. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its ovell reliance on foreign imports with the launch of the country's largest petrochemical operation. ♪ when emerson takes up the challenge, "it's never been done before" simply bemes consider it solved.
money printing. in those environments, gold does very well. you have the goldman sachs downgrade. you have people picking sides. then you have the slowing chinese debt. i think that really hits the market all at once. that led to margins being that and they continue to tumble downwards. dagen: talk about the difference you are seeing in behavior. are you seeing any selling among those physical gold owners? >> not as dramatic of a difference. we are a precious metals platform. on friday and monday, we had four to five times as many body and sell orders. we have done our own research. i think that plays into my point. it is somewhat reminiscent to what happened to apple. in the paper market, you have a dramatic selloff. in the physical market, the demand is very, very strong. connell: let's follow up on that. let's talk about apple. the big game for the dollar versus the euro. is that part of the case you make for gold? >> i think part of the reason is for safety. in times like this, i think now is a fantastic entry point. it is certainly better than two weeks ago. it is uncorrelated. t
the threat from canada. the environment has changed and whatever good this bill has, it's going to take a back seat right now. what do you say? >> well, look, whenever there's a crime, you saw this on the shootings, the murders in connecticut. people wanted gun control before the shootings, tried to exploit that tragedy. the people who are against high-skilled workers coming into this country, all the antiimmigrant groups, are against all immigrants, not just some, and they're already trying to exploit these murders in boston to attack immigration of everybody. i don't think it will work. the american people are smarter than that. yes, the fbi should good of bad guys, evidently they let some slip through their fingers, in the case of boston. but everything in this bill moves in the right direction for security and the american economy, and all the kind of questions you ought to have. shame on the people who tried to use the murders in boston to undermine immigration reform. i don't think they'll be able to do it. >> neil: all right. thank you very much. good seeing you again, grover nor
environment. so we think they have got a number of positive stimuli going forward. probably a cheap as pe that emc has had for several years. lori: gene, make us some money here if you would. really interesting defensive stocks really led this rally. what do you think if we're coming down now? >> well, you know, leadership has been in a lot of different areas, and not just year-to-date but over the last year-and-a-half. david: forgive me, guys, i have got to break in here. we have american express express earnings. dennis, what are the numbers? >> yes the numbers beat the street on earnings but fall below revenue. street wanted 8.03 billion. earnings per share, american express, 1.15 a share. street was thinking $1.12. that is a beat. quarterlyly dividend for amex raised 15%. the company will spend $3.2 billion extra this year on stock buybacks before year-end and another one billion dollars in the first quarter of 2014. stock buybacks support a stock price. can't tell, looks like amex might head down. wall street hate as miss even though earnings beat. lori: todd horowitz, earnings seaso
with our reduced output so the faith is still there, that it's well run in a bad macro economic environment which comes back to mcdonald's which you have a note out today from sus can dehanna which says it is executing across the world and it is stable in its market share or gaining and it is against it. that seems to be the major theme. >> another theme that's sort of emerged in these big companies, citigroup, as well is the strength of the latin american consumer and the latin american corporation. caterpillar noting that lshg, even though china continues to be weak and there seems to be a shift from asia pacific to latin america coming from these multinationals. >> resuming the buyback does not hurt by the end of the year. it had approved for a while in '07. >> and that might be taking some of the sting out of this today. >> when we come back, yet another price target cut for apple ahead of its earnings and this time from bmo. colin gilles over at bgc is upgrading the stock this morning. which one is right? we'll hear from both analysts this morning. the dow coming off its worst week sin
're going to slow down the purchases but you're still easy. and that environment has a long tail to it, which should produce cash flow in the u.s. economy, 5% or better. >> so why isn't the public playing this market? why are they not in this market? >> the most recent memory in all of their heads, every single macro event risk they've all seen, whether it's the situation in europe or closer to home, the financial crisis, and that's going to last for quite a long period of time, especially since the household itself, the liability shelf, is still there and it's still in repair. >> and if anything that prolongs that rally, right? >> no question about it. that's the misguided notion out there, which is, you want to not all rush in there at once, but the reality is, no, that's where you get multiples go up to 18, 19 times and get the boom bust. the first move is cash to equities, not fixed income to equities. that second move is fixed income flows to equities, when the economy really gets above 3%. >> what are you going to buy here? >> well, we like almost everything in equities. our favo
. private equity is certainly doing well in this environment. i'm, i guess, a little surprised that we haven't seen more deals, given the fact that rates are at such low levels. shouldn't we be seeing a whole host of deal flow and deal activity? >> we should, and we may. i guess, the opposite side of a coin of a buoyant stock market is higher evaluations and less attractive targets in the public arena. as a stock holder, and i was glad to see blackstone back off from a bid on dell. but, you know, these companies are kind of out of the mainstream. if you're a stock holder, you're actually a unit holder. you get a k-1 form, as if you were a limited partner in almost a hedge fund. the accounting is eccentric, because, well, because gap doesn't quite do these companies justice. so you have to look at this so-called economic net income. and there's this seeming paradox of private equity companies being in the private market. and if private equities are so great, why are they public? there's a lot of bad will, i think, towards these companies, but they offer that thing that is most scarce today in
environment even more. i think you have a great, virtuous cycle that's kicking in. >> that cuts to the fundamental question about netflix whether it's growing fast enough to pay for the international expansion and to pay for the content bills that it's rack up. >> if you look in detail at these figures who which you have to still, the loss overseas is $77 million and the negative free cash flow is 42 million, tony. >> there are a couple of things that have gone on in this quarter. one, we do see these improvements in the use of accounts payable which in the cash flow and the u.s. streaming business scale better which should provide more cash flow and the dvd business is not declining as fast and these guys are managing the business pretty well. if i can on the international, it's down, but not down as much assy we expected and the way to think about that is maybe these international markets are getting to profitability sooner than expected and it may not be as big of a drag as people thought going in. they're focusing on traditional valuation in the near-term. i think what the s
in the first quarter. there is not much opportunity in a low yield environment. we're looking low single-digit type returns. maybe mid single at best. i think emd is is one of those opportunities. central banks paused in the first quarter in most markets in emerging market countries. i think the bump in yield we saw in the first quarter is an opportunity. we still think longer term those economies grow faster than developed countries. much less debt relative to the size of the economy. lori: i have to sop you there. we have breaking news. >> that opens up potential easing in the coming months. lori: it is an important part of every once investment portfolio. anthony, thanks. we'll check in with you. >> thank you. melissa: we have more breaking news about those reports that investigators believe they have identified a boston bomb suspect. rich edson is live at the white house with more on this rich, what have you heard? >> here are the details. fox news confirming authorities investigating the boston marathon bodies have an image of a young man carrying and perhaps dropping a bag at the s
to make sure it fosters an environment where we can have small, medium and large banks, where we can have community banks that thrive, regional banks that tlooip thrive and large global banks. incidentally, andrew, if you look at the largest 50 banks, only about a half dozen are u.s. banks and incidentally, of the top 20 or 25 banks, our largest is number ten. so in terms of the size of our banks vis-a-vis our overall economy, much smaller than our international fears. >> but what about the idea that it's not just the banks. it's the financial companies, the insurance companies -- >> in addition to banks, we do have insurance companies in the financial services forum. >> there have been a lot of questions raised about all the regulations that were dropped on the banks when some of these other companies, like aig, for example, they were a huge problem and they're not going to be regulated in quite the same way. there's talk about cracking down on the insurer, as well. >> in the case of the nonbank, the group that was created under dodd-frank, the fsoc, is looking to designate a number of t
be idea to pay for some things in a political environment. not to say it will because of the political coalition that is against this is quite powerful, but seems to me there's more of a possibility now than in the past. if that's of any solace. >> let me address a little bit the patient-doctor relationship or the patient-doctor-doctor relationship, which is maybe just as important, more important. one of the criticisms of traditional medicare, it is an uncoordinated system. that's correct. and the coordination isn't just between patient and doctor. obviously the fee for service incentives can get in the way of that. but it's also the failure of traditional medicare to really provide structure incentives that encourage coordination across the continuum of care, doctor to doctor, doctor to hospital. medicare is not unique in this but medicare could take more of a leading role in trying to resolve a problem that's a very difficult issue. in the end, i think what we need is health plans, whether it's medicare or other plans, that focus on this and i think that's going to be driven by the
't replace the wild west environment with a legal situation. >> let me ask another question. techis that the highest end. i'm thinking of a rhode island business that has a high technical level of accomplishment. they don't have a colossal hr department. they work in a particular niche, when they can identify the person they need as the person they need, there may be the person with a skill set like that anywhere to be found. if you need a specific profile in dover, does this give you the capability to reach outnd recrthat person? the concern i ve heard from these businesses ieven iyou have heard from this person and start recruiting them, it creates so much uncertainty and delay and havoc that if they have an international capability, they will go wherever -- to germany, india or china. are you comfortable we can compete with those kind of people where there is a specific person you are looking for? >> i think the bill seeks a number of important steps. is of the points you hit on just by going to brown, the ph going to a hospital. help, ashe numbers long as we avoidniend consequen
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